Flash Read

Morale-as-a-Service?

Tech Trends & Future of Work

October 29, 2020
·
5
min read
An image of a touch screen showing where you can vote for your experience with a particular service

There’s a lot of talk about IT leaders transitioning into business leaders, especially as the remote workforce situation gets dragged on into what’s starting to feel like forever. Classical representations of IT leaders tell us that emotional intelligence has perhaps not often been identified as their standout ability. While CIOs have been (hopefully) busy working on their emotional intelligence (by watching TEDTalks, presumably), IT has increasingly turned to SaaS and outsourcing for many of the processes that used to be handled internally. A savvy CIO might be tempted to ask, could there be a SaaS that can help with the well-being of my remote team? It turns out that there are, and yet no one seems to have coined this obvious new marketable tool category: welcome to ‘Morale-as-a-Service’. 


There’s an old adage that too often goes overlooked: customer service begins with employees. A motivated and enthusiastic team, driven by a positive mindset, translates to every customer interaction; it’s company culture personified into touch points. This feeling has recently morphed into the idea of ‘employee experience’, and indeed even the ‘Chief Employee Experience Officer’. But how do we know what the employee experience truly is? 


We’ve become better at measuring the conversions of touch points and engagements into sales through click-throughs and open rates. Can we also measure morale?


Some vendors think so. Culture Amp basically offers a continuous deployment platform for overseeing employee engagement and development, offering internal ‘Pulse’ (ahem) surveys that dive deep into employee psychology. Officevibe offers something called ‘Conversation Engine’, which saves managers time by outsourcing talking points, plus a suite of other features designed to engineer interaction into ‘actionables’—and they also offer ‘Pulse’ surveys (what is going on here?). There’s also TINYPulse (seriously?) that comes right out and promises that you’ll be able to “Read employee thoughts and feedback in real time.” (A dubious claim, but things might change pretty quickly should a manager ever truly hear what an employee thinks after being asked to fill out the 7th feedback report after a product launch week.) Achievers has trademarked something called ‘Culture Continuity’ as part of a three-pronged platform that assists teams  to build a culture, ‘activate employee engagement in real-time’ and apply ‘data science’ to improve performance. 


These vendors all promise metrics that sound desirable to team leaders—the ability to measure ‘happiness’ along trend lines. Who wouldn’t want that? The thing is, all the testimonials come from the team leads. I’d be interested to hear more about the employee experience. Regardless, capturing employee morale should pique the CFO’s interest...


When wellbeing metrics can be lined up against conversions and performance, they can be used to convince the CFO and the board to invest in measures that keep morale on the up; if there’s a demonstrable upswing on ROI, the checkbook may stay open. But there’s some murky potential here.


If morale comes to be viewed solely as a metric of performance and ROI, the classic capitalist switch can be flipped to demand growth of that metric. Morale must be optimized. Morale-boosting factors must be iterated on. Those employees whose morale is lacking must be… let go? It’s logical to see a 1984 situation playing out with this. If employees can smile through physical/Zoom meetings they’d rather not be in, they can keep up that facade when they know the company wants to ‘measure’ their happiness.


If morale can be accurately measured that’s awesome. But the focus of those measurements should remain on the employees’ genuine morale. If the business becomes obsessed with optimizing and rewarding morale for business gains, employees may learn what the stakes are and game the system—to the detriment of themselves and the organization: keep smiling through the grimace of another sleepless night hitting those KPIs until companies start wondering why morale scores are so high but the employee churn rate keeps spiralling upwards. 


If metrics are what it takes to land some investment for improving employee experience, so be it. And if it actually helps identify employee pain points and improve on them, fantastic. But at the end of the day, the biggest factor that keeps morale up might be remembering that employees are humans—and humans need to feel crappy sometimes. They need to rest. They need to spend time making and eating nourishing food. That can be acknowledged in-house, at zero cost.


Technology might be able to augment our understanding of morale, and even provide a framework for how leaders can manage it. But making morale-building an entirely tech-led process might end up missing the simple human requirements of what ‘employee experience’ is aiming for. Keep watching those Ted Talks.

“While we can consume research from traditional firms, in many cases we're guessing or approximating or assuming certain attitudes in senior IT from various pieces of broad, canned research. Pulse let us find out and dive into exactly what we needed to know about our target market.”
Lance Walter, CMO at Neo4j
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